F-84 Service in Yugoslavia

Logo Yugoslavian Air Force

Jugoslovensko Ratno Vazduhoplovstvo


F-84G in Yugoslav Air Force

By Jason Floyd

The JRV operated 219 aircraft from 1953 to 1974. 169 were direct from USAF stocks and 50 came from the Greek Air Force. 30 aircraft were converted locally to RF-84G recon version. They were called IF-84G in JRV terminology. Initial training for Yugoslav pilots on the F-84 was believed to be at the 493rd Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 48th Fighter-Bomber Wing at Chaumont AFB, France in 1953. The F-84G wore serials in the 10500, 10600 and 10700 range.

The following units flew the F-84G. Most of these units also had squadrons with the F-86E and the F-86D at the same base.

81 LBAP was based at Nis and operated the F-84 from 1954 to 1960. The regiment was disbanded and reformed as a Support Regiment.
82 LBAP was based at Cerklje near Zagreb and operated the F-84 from 1966 to 1972 and later transitioned to the Jastreb.
88 LBAP was based at Sombar and Batajnica near Belgrade and operated the F-84 from 1954 to 1966. The Regiment was disbanded.
97 AB was based at Mostar and Split and operated the F-84 from 1964 to 1974. Later they transitioned to the Jastreb.
98 AB was based at Skopje and operated the F-84 from 1966 to 1972 and later converted to the Jastreb.
109 LBAP was based at Cerkje and operated the F-84 from 1961 to 1966. The regiment was later renamed the 82 LBAP.
172 LBAP was based at Titograd and operated the F-84 from 1953 to 1964. They later converted to the Galeb.
184 IAP was based at Cerkje and operated the F-84 from 1961 to 1966. The regiment was split into individual squadrons that continued to operate until 1974 in several locations.
198 LBAP was based at Skopje and operated the F-84 from 1954 to 1966. The regiment was later renamed the 98 AB.
204 LBAP was based at Batajnica and operated the F-84 from 1953 to 1956. They later transitioned to the F-86 Sabre.

Note on JRV Terminology

LBAP translates to Fighter-Bomber regiment normally consisting of three squadrons.
AB translates to Aviation Brigade and operated different aircraft in the naval support role.
IAP translates to the Reconnaissance Regiment.

JRV Colors

Initial F-84s delivered the JRV in 1953 were finished in Aluminum with bright red tail sections and wing tip tanks. The bright red that was carried on the aircraft varied from plane to plane. It is unknown at what time JRV F-84s received camouflage but it was in the 60s. They probably received camouflage as part of their air-to-ground role. Even then the colors varied, for example aircraft # 10516/516 of the 172 LBAP was painted in Dark Green FS 24079 and Dark Sea Grey FS 26118 upper surfaces and PRU Blue FS 25164 undersurfaces. This was called the RAF scheme and it is unknown how many aircraft operated with this scheme. The most common scheme carried was called the JRV scheme and consisted of Olive Green FS 34102 and Medium Grey FS 36270 upper surfaces and PRU Blue FS 25164. Again the scheme varied from aircraft to aircraft. The 3-digit escadrille number was normally carried in white on the nose and in two locations opposite the roundels on the upper starboard wing and lower port wing. Some aircraft such as 10516/516 had black numbers as did the aluminum colored aircraft. The full serial was carried in black on the tip of the tail above the tri-colored fin flash.


RF-84G Recce Aircraft in Yugoslavia Service

by Duncan Curtis

In 1960, with the withdrawal from operational Yugoslav service of piston-engined reconnaissance aircraft (especially Mosquito Mk 38s), modification of the first F-84G aircraft to reconnaissance configuration was carried out. This modification was carried out by Vazduhoplovno Tehnickog Remontnog Zavoda 'Jastreb' (Air Force Technical Repair Centre/VTRZ 'Hawk') at Zemun. It involved fitting built-in equipment with aero-foto film in the nose of the aircraft and tip-tanks. First of these modified F-84Gs was alloted to operational units during 1961. Upon delivery, the modified aircraft were designated as RF-84G, and entered operational service with 184 Reconnaissance Aircraft Wing.

A further unit (unknown) converted from indigenous Ikarus 214s to the RF-84G in 1966. They survived in service until 1973.

Photos in the Yugoslav book Jets shows both the tip tank installation (which I gather could be rotated for maintenance and/or for exposing different camera windows) and the camera fitted just aft of the nosewheel.


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RF-84G fitted with recce modifications to Fletcher tanks.

RF-84G fitted with under-fuselage recce camera.



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RF-84G fitted with under-fuselage recce camera.

RF-84G fitted with recce modifications to Fletcher tank.

Photos by Bojan Dimitrijevic, courtesy of Duncan Curtis, used by permission.
See also Photos section for more photos by or from Duncan Curtis.


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